Memoria Press 6th Grade Literature Set ~ a TOS review

Memoria Press Guides

If you have read much from me, you understand that our family seems to revolve around literature. When we were offered a review from Memoria Press, I felt it was a very good fit for our family. The older two girls are both using the Sixth Grade Literature Guide Set  and I have been pleased with the way it has gone.

We have been blessed to receive Memoria Press materials in the past and have always been pleased with them. The Literature Guide Set has been no different. Memoria Press is a family-run company producing classical Christian education materials for homeschoolers and private schools. They are simple and easy-to-use and focus on logic, Latin, and classical studies. Their literature guides are based on quality literature and engaging with that literature.

The Literature Guides are intended to help students become engaged readers who understand and can reason with the material they are reading. By asking the students to think, compare, contrast, and build vocabulary, they are being pushed to become excellent readers and thinkers.

Memoria Press Literature Guides Review

We received the Sixth Grade Literature Guide Set. It included a Student Guide and Teacher Manual for each of the following titles:

  • Adam of the Road
  • Robin Hood
  • King Arthur and His Knights of the Round Table
  • The Door in the Wall

The set did not include the literature books but if you would like to, you can purchase the books from Memoria Press, as well.

King ArthurThe Door In The Wall

Miss E has been working on The Door in the Wall. Miss L has been reading King Arthur. Both girls have been approaching the study the same way. They read a chapter or section (some days have two chapters) and answer approximately half of the questions on one day. The next day, they finish the questions and complete any enrichment activities. Depending on the length of the reading, this takes them approximately 30 – 45 minutes per day. From taking a look through the other two student guides, I believe that they would work the same way.

working with an atlasThe questions are similar for each lesson. We found that all four of the student books are set up the same way.

  1. A quote to read – King Arthur and Adam of the Road both had quotes from the section read. The Door in the Wall has some questions related to the quote.
  2. Reading Notes – These tended to be people that are encountered in the section/chapter. Some of these were terms, words, or objects that the reader might not be familiar with.
  3. Vocabulary – The vocabulary terms are stated in context from the selection. The student is expected to write a definition for the term.
  4. Comprehension Questions – These are a set of questions of varying difficulty related to the section read. These tend to have right or wrong answers. Some of it is directly out of the book and some of it has got to be reasoned out.
  5. Discussion Questions – This set of questions is a bit more open for understanding and interpretation in the answers given. Much of this is intended to be discussed orally, though I did have the girls write a few of these on days when oral discussion was not easily done.
  6. Enrichment – These are activities to be completed. Many times there are readings that relate to the culture and times of the setting of the book. Some of it includes memorization. One activity I noticed was completing a drawing after reading about castles.

writing definitions

The student book is intended to be written in and utilized by a single student. Each page includes space to write the answers for the vocabulary and comprehension questions, as well as some of the discussion questions. The books we received all have maps, one includes a family tree, and all of them include some additional materials such as poetry related to the study in some way and a glossary organized by book chapter.

The Teacher’s Manual includes all that the Student Guide has and the answers to all of the questions plus quizzes and tests. There is a separate section for the discussion question answers. The glossary and discussion questions are separated by chapter so it is easy to locate what you need.

L workingThe Student Guide and the Teacher’s Manual are not reproducible. However, you may copy the quizzes and tests from the Teacher’s Manual.

I like that these are easy to use and it is clear how to use them. They are easy to break down into a section that works for you and your student. If you need to do some of the questions orally, that is easy. Sometimes the girls would get stumped with a question and so we moved to an oral format. It worked well and allowed the girls to continue with a bit more help. The program is very flexible.

These are a fairly mixed level of books, as far as reading level goes. The Door in the Wall could be used a grade level lower, in my opinion, but there are some fairly tough questions to consider. King Arthur is a long book, which isn’t a challenge for my girls, but if you have a reader who is intimidated by the size of the book, this will be one of those. It is around 400 pages. Robin Hood is a pretty good sized book, as well, while Adam of the Road is similar to A Door In The Wall as far as reading and size goes.

My 4th grader is easily working with King Arthur. She enjoys study guides and legends, so King Arthur is a good fit. My 6th grader is a good reader and chose The Door in the Wall, which has some really deep thinking questions and she is having to work hard at them. So, be prepared with this set to have a great variety that is well suited to challenging the reader in several ways.

If your reader is a struggling reader, you might want to look carefully at a grade level lower.

looking up definitionsI have been pleased, yet again, with the materials we received from Memoria Press. Their Sixth Grade Literature Guide Set has been a joy to use. Miss E is almost done with The Door in the Wall and Miss L is working her way through King Arthur. I think we will enjoy using Adam of the Road and Robin Hood, as well, when we finish the ones we are on. If you are interested in other products that we have reviewed from Memoria Press, check out Famous Men of Rome and New American Cursive.

At Home.

Find Memoria Press on social media:
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Looking for a different level of literature kits, the Review Crew took a look at everything from PK to 9th grade sets. Click on the banner below to view the listing and read a different review.

Memoria Press Literature Guides ReviewCrew Disclaimer

 

 

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One thought on “Memoria Press 6th Grade Literature Set ~ a TOS review

  1. […] have been impressed with all of the Memoria Press products we have reviewed (6th Grade Literature set, Famous Men of Rome, and New American Cursive). This product is no different. The […]

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