Shall I Crucify My Savior? ~ hymn

Shall I Crucify My Savior

This morning in worship, we sang this hymn. It was so lovely and the words cut to the heart. They definitely gave me something to think on while I took of the Lord’s Supper. Communion is such an important remembrance of Jesus Christ and this hymn really focused my thoughts about just who Jesus died for. You see, Jesus died for me. And you. And every person God has created. I nailed Jesus to that cross. My sins. The second verse of this song –

Are temptations so alluring?
Do earth’s pleasures so enthrall
That I cannot love my Savior
Well enough to leave them all?

That really got me when I read over those words. It is way too often that I stumble over the things of this world. But can I love Jesus enough to walk away from this world?

I am striving to each day. Some days I am better at focusing on Jesus and other days, well, not so much. But each day is new and God’s blessings are given anew. So, I’ll keep trying.

Blessings,
At Home.

Listen to this song at Classic Acapella Songs – click on number 94. It is a lovely rendition of the song.

Shall I Crucify My Savior?

words: Carrie Breck (1896)
music: Grant Colfax Tullar (1896)

1 Shall I crucify my Saviour,
When for me He bore such loss?
Shall I put to shame my Savior?
Can I nail Him to the cross?

Chorus:
Shall I crucify my Savior?
Crucify my Lord again?
Once! oh, once! I crucified Him!
Shall I crucify again?

2 Are temptations so alluring?
Do earth pleasures so enthrall?
That I cannot love my Savior
Well enough to leave them all? [Chorus]

3 ‘T was my sins that crucified Him,
Shall they crucify Him yet?
Blackest day of nameless anguish,
Can my thankless soul forget? [Chorus]

4 Oh, the kindly hands of Jesus,
Pouring blessings on all men!
Bleeding nail-scarred hands of Jesus!
Can I nail them once again? [Chorus]

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X – Middle School Books ~ Blogging Through The Alphabet

X

What to do? What to do? I just can’t come up with anything. Goodness! Harder and harder!

There were several suggestions for books that had an X “in” the title but only one that started with X.

So, for the pleasure of sharing something, here are some titles with X that look pretty interesting.

This book looks interesting to me –

Betty Before X by Ilyasah Shabazz

It is about a young black girl in the 1940s in Detroit. It shows the difficulty, the challenge, and the heartbreak. Betty grows up and becomes the wife of Malcom X, which influenced the title.

Read a full review of this book by A Net In Time.

Soldier X by Don L. Wulffson

This book is a look behind enemy lines during WWII. As a teenager, Erik goes as a soldier for Germany, experiencing the horrors of war and the Third Reich. The story looks interesting and difficult at the same time.

This book was suggested by Hopkins Homeschool.

Xander and the Lost Island of Monsters by Margaret Dilloway

6th grader Xander is looking forward to a break and spending the time with his friend and his comics. He will be thrust, instead, into a dramatic and challenging adventure.

This book was suggested by Walking Fruitfully.

Hopefully you saw one that looked interesting and will explore it. If you have other suggestions for the letter X, I would love to hear them.

Blessings,
At Home.

 

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The ABC linkup is hosted by Hopkins HomeschoolDoodleMom’s Homeschooling Life and Biblical Womanhood.

My previous posts in the series:

A – All-of-a-Kind Family and Adventures of the Little Wooden Horse
B – Ballet Shoes and A Bear Called Paddington
C – Counting by 7s and Cheaper By The Dozen
D – Door In The Wall & D’Aulaires’ Book of Greek Myths
E – The Endless Steppe & Ella Enchanted
F – Family Tree & Fog Magic
G – Great Turkey Walk & The Great Brain
H – Half Magic & Horse Diaries
I – Indian in the Cupboard & Island of the Blue Dolphins
J – Journey to America & Julie: An American Girl – 1974
K – Kite Fighters & Key to the Extraordinary
L – Little Women & Long Way From Chicago
M – Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle & Mistakes That Worked
N – North Child & Number the Stars
O – One and Only Ivan & Our Only May Amelia
P – Pollyanna & Prism of Wings
Q – Quanah Parker & Quake!
R – Robin Hood & Rilla of Ingleside
S – Sisters Grimm & Singer of All Songs
T – Thick as Thieves & Twinkle Tales
U – Under the Lilacs
V – Valkyrie & Voyage on the Titanic
W – War That Saved My Life & Wonderful Wizard of Oz

Strawberry Cupcakes ~ wheat free recipe

You may be noticing a trend in the recipes I have been sharing recently – wheat free. That is how I am titling them but they are also corn free. Those are two big allergies for me. Over the course of the last couple of years, we have searched out recipe sites and books that have wheat free and corn free options. More and more are coming up wheat free but they sub in things that are not really all that much better or create a funny texture. We try to stay away from rice flour since there is basically no nutrition to it and it is grainy in recipes.

strawberry cupcakes

Recently, my daughter wanted to make strawberry cupcakes for her birthday and her friend was coming who is allergic to wheat. She made her normal cupcakes but then helped me search for a recipe that was wheat free. We found one that worked pretty good and made some changes to it.

Our base recipe is found here.

When we got done with the recipe, it looked more like this:

  • 1 cup coconut flour
  • 1 cup almond meal
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 4 ounces cream cheese
  • 3 eggs
  • 1/2 cup almond milk
  • 1 tablespoon strawberry extract (optional)
  • 2 cups frozen strawberries, thawed and crushed (we ran them through the blender)

We just mixed all the wet ingredients together, except for the strawberries. We then added the dry. After it was well combined, we added the strawberries. Mix it and then put it in either greased muffin tins or cupcake papers and bake at 375 degrees for 25 – 35 minutes.  When they are cooked, you can insert a toothpick and it will come out clean. Cool and then frost.

We did not use the frosting that is part of the original recipe. We had some strawberry frosting that Miss J used to frost half of them and the other half she left without.

strawberry cupcakes recipe

These must be stored in the refrigerator since they have cream cheese in them and they are more moist than you expect from a cupcake. With the small amount of sugar and the healthy flours, these also make a yummy breakfast with a cup of hot tea. In fact, I have enjoyed them for breakfast quite often since we made these. They are really filling and stick with you for a while. Good things for breakfasts!

Blessings,
At Home.

 

Linking up with A Net In Time for a recipe linkup.

Linking up with Homeschool Review Crew weekly linkup.

Creation Illustrated ~ a Crew review

Creation Illustrated review

I am so thrilled to share this new review with you guys! Creation Illustrated is a new company to me that I have just fallen in love with. They have a beautiful quarterly magazine and  in-depth unit studies that correspond to the magazines.

Creation Illustrated 

Creation Illustrated has been around since 1993 and has a mission to share biblical truth through their work. The company is dedicated to the eternal impact that sharing this truth has. They also want to share character-building lessons through the blessings we have with God’s creation. These are simple, yet impactful, ideas that will touch any who choose to listen and hear.

Creation Illustrated is edited and published by Tom and Jennifer Ish, a Christian couple. They are a family who chose homeschooling for the education of their daughter. They understand what many families are looking for in unit studies and science curriculum. You can read much more about their lives and their mission on the Creation Illustrated website.

GrandCnyn-Spread-F17

The Creation Illustrated magazine is stunning and gorgeous. I thoroughly enjoyed spending time reading these magazines and since I like print copies of magazines better than digital ones, I am ordering a subscription. The photography is just beautiful and a joy to look at. More than that, though, articles that have a biblical base and bring creation into focus on God are what I enjoy reading and having around for my girls to read. The articles are well-written and interesting. This is a magazine I would be happy to have around all the time.

The unit studies that are available are interesting and quite different than other studies we have used. Snow Unit Study and Pine Trees are the two we have been looking at and using recently. Well, we have completed Pine Trees and hope to work fully with the snow study soon. These correspond to the Winter ’18 Digital Edition and  Fall ’17 Digital Edition of the Creation Illustrated magazines. When you purchase the unit study, there is a link to the digital edition of the magazine on the resources page.

Creation Illustrated Unit Study Pine TreesWe took last week to use the Pine Trees unit study. It worked perfectly for us as we needed something different for school as we prepared for a leadership convention. We spent about an hour a day with the unit study and completed it in about three days. The time varies a bit from child to child. My 13 year old and my 11 year old were able to do this independently except for the math page and a tad bit of the vocabulary. My 9 year old needed assistance with most of the study.

Fall 2017, Vol. 24, No. 3The unit study is correlated with an article on pages 6-10 in the Fall ’17 Digital Edition titled “The Enduring Pine Tree.” This is an article that discusses not only the scientific side of the pine tree but also the biblical side. Included in the article you find much information on similarities and differences of pine trees. There is information on how to identify the type of pine tree. From the early stages of growth to Miss E reading the magazine article on pine treesthe fully mature tree, we learn much about the pine tree. Alongside the scientific information, we learn about many biblical references to pine trees. The scripture is quoted and cited, which makes it easy for the student to follow up with the scripture in their own copy of the Bible. The article is a very enjoyable read. When you pair it with the stunning photography, it is just a beautiful article. (There are many other articles in this edition of the magazine – the Grand Canyon, kangaroos, and recipes to name a few.)

After reading the article, we opened up the pages for the unit study which I had printed for each of the girls. The unit study consisted of a page with resource links, vocabulary, spelling, a Bible study, a geography study with mapping exercise, identification of three types of trees, scientific information activities, comprehension questions, a math page, an art/drawing activity, a creative writing exercise, and a word search. There is also an answer key. The resource links are for the Miss L working on pine trees unit studymagazine, articles, and videos that will help the study complete the study. I actually missed these when I printed the study because I was so excited to get to the pages and we worked harder than we had to on some parts of the study that first day. That’s okay – we got internet search practice in!

While the girls were not thrilled with having to do a unit study during this particular week, I did catch from them that it was a pleasant one to do. They seemed to enjoy it pretty well and I know they learned a lot. I learned a lot, too, and I grew up around pine trees with a forester dad.

I liked that the more difficult parts – the classification of the tree with Miss J working the pine trees word searchLatin names, for example – were an easier activity, such as matching. The vocabulary was a challenging activity because the words were difficult. I did have to help all three girls with this, even with an electronic dictionary at hand.

This is a great study that really helped us grasp a lot about the physical characteristics of pine trees but I really liked the Bible study that was included. I did not realize that pine trees were specifically mentioned so many times in the Bible. The students are asked to look up several scriptures and note the mention and what the tree was used for. It was an interesting look into God’s word. It would have been great for the scriptures used to be included in the pages to print, though it wasn’t hard for the girls to just look it up on their Bible app.

Creation Illustrated Unit Study Snow There is also a unit study on snow that we will be using before too long. It corresponds to an article on pages 19-22 in the Winter ’18 Digital Edition titled “The Intricacies of Snow.” The activities in this unit study are much the same as those in the study of pine tree, though, of course, related to snow. I can’t wait to see my girls complete the art activity where they draw the different snow crystal shapes. The Bible study will have them looking at the references to snow in the Bible and evaluating their favorite verse. The creative writing activity will correspond to fun in the snow. There is much more there, too.Winter 2018, Vol. 24, No. 4

The unit studies created by Creation Illustrated are such fun and they have more than just these two. There are studies on bears, manatees, fragrance, badgers, dragonflies, and the Joshua tree. They are aimed primarily at grades 5 – 8, though they can easily be used in grades 3 – 8. The studies are mostly independent for grades 5-8 but there is much that will be interesting and beneficial for the 3rd – 4th graders. These studies are downloads and are able to be used for multiple students – always a bonus!

CI Sum15 Cover Pages

I have really enjoyed getting to know Creation Illustrated better and am pleased to be able to share this company with you. I look forward to seeing more from them. Their newest edition, the Spring 2018 edition, is on the presses now and will soon be out. The corresponding unit study will be on butterflies and should be available on the website soon.

Blessings,
At Home.

Connect with Creation Illustrated through the various social media channels –

The Homeschool Review Crew had many families using these unit studies. To find out how they enjoyed them, please click on the banner below.

 

Creation Illustrated Unit Studies {Creation Illustrated Reviews}Crew Disclaimer

W – Middle School Books ~ Blogging Through the Alphabet

W

The letter W was actually quite easy to get a list for. We probably have too many titled for it but that’s okay. I’ll share them anyway.

Wonderful Wizard of OzThe Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum

This is the book that the wonderfully imaginative movie was created from. The story is a glorious read with tons of opportunity for the reader to use their imagination. It has all the elements you would expect if you have seen the movie – Dorothy being swept away in a tornado, landing in a strange village, befriending the tin man, the lion, and the scarecrow. Even the flying monkey are included. But the book is vastly different from the movie in the way the story runs along. It was a fantastic read aloud for our family and we definitely recommend it. The following books in the series were not quite so interesting for the girls so I think we only got through two additional books and they were quite different.

War That Saved My Life
The War That Saved My Life by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley

Summary provided by Miss L: This was a book about Ada, who is 10. She was born with a club foot and her mother did not like her. When WWII started and the government began evacuating children from London, her mother decided to send Ada’s brother to the country but not her. Ada decided she was going to go to, even though her mother had not given her permission. In the country, she gets to live a very different sort of life with all these luxuries and all the food she wants. Her mother comes back to get her and life changes again, leaving Ada wanting to return to the country.

Wrinkle in Time
A Wrinkle in Time by Madeline L’Engle

Summary provided by Miss L: Meg is the main character, along with her brother Charles Wallace and their friend Calvin. They go on a voyage with three old ladies who have magical powers to a bunch of different planets in the solar system. They are on a search to find Meg’s father.

Wings of FireWings of Fire: The Dragon Prophesy by Tui T Southerland

This is book 1 in the series.

Summary provided by Miss E: It is about dragons and there are humans that are called scavengers. The dragons see them as animals. In this first book, it is centered on Clay, a mud-wing dragon. He and four other dragons are trapped under a mountain by three other dragons, the Guardians. The Guardians keep telling them that being kept there is for their own good. The dragons have not ever seen the outside, except small peeks through the sky hole. They come up with a plan to escape and they succeed. In the process, though, they get captured by the queen of the Sky-wings, who are involved in a war. According to a prophesy, Clay and his friends are supposed to stop this war. Once in captivity, Queen Scarlet likes to watch dragons fight and kill each other and this is what Clay and his friends are captured for. In the end, they are able to escape, with the help of the queen’s “killer dragon”, and they take off to find their parents.

 

Wide Awake Princess
The Wide-Awake Princess by E.D. Baker

Summary provided by Miss E: The Wide-Awake Princess is about a girl named Annie. Her sister is Sleeping Beauty. When Annie was a baby, she only got one christening gift – magic could not touch her, whether good or bad. When the curse on Sleeping Beauty takes effect, Annie is not affected. She and her friend Liam, one of the guards, go to find all the princes so that one of them can reverse the curse and wake Sleeping Beauty. This is the story of their travels.

There are several other books about Annie and they are fun books to read. The last couple in the series about Annie include characters from the Frog Princess series so the stories overlap a bit, sharing character. This is fun and now that she has shared the summary with you, Miss E wants to read it yet again. (I think we know what is going on her library check-out list for next week!)

 

There are two other W-titled books that I want to put on your radar. I am not providing a summary for these but they are ones that we keep on our shelves.

Wolves of Willoughby Chase by Joan Aiken

The Wouldbegoods by E. Nesbit

Hope you have some good reading time this week and find some titles that bring you joy.

Blessings,
At Home.

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The ABC linkup is hosted by Hopkins HomeschoolDoodleMom’s Homeschooling Life and Biblical Womanhood.

My previous posts in the series:

A – All-of-a-Kind Family and Adventures of the Little Wooden Horse
B – Ballet Shoes and A Bear Called Paddington
C – Counting by 7s and Cheaper By The Dozen
D – Door In The Wall & D’Aulaires’ Book of Greek Myths
E – The Endless Steppe & Ella Enchanted
F – Family Tree & Fog Magic
G – Great Turkey Walk & The Great Brain
H – Half Magic & Horse Diaries
I – Indian in the Cupboard & Island of the Blue Dolphins
J – Journey to America & Julie: An American Girl – 1974
K – Kite Fighters & Key to the Extraordinary
L – Little Women & Long Way From Chicago
M – Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle & Mistakes That Worked
N – North Child & Number the Stars
O – One and Only Ivan & Our Only May Amelia
P – Pollyanna & Prism of Wings
Q – Quanah Parker & Quake!
R – Robin Hood & Rilla of Ingleside
S – Sisters Grimm & Singer of All Songs
T – Thick as Thieves & Twinkle Tales
U – Under the Lilacs
V – Valkyrie & Voyage on the Titanic

 

Lost Civilizations Unit Study

Lost Civilizations Study

We strive to meet the interests and needs of our girls individually. When chatting with Miss L about what she wanted to take a look at for history this year, she said she wanted to study lost civilizations. When we went a little bit further in the discussion, I determined that this meant the civilizations that just kind of disappeared from a very long time ago. So, that is where our name came from. This does not include ancient civilizations such as Egypt, Rome, or Greece. Those are a different category for her.

So, what we did first was to list the group she knew about. Those were:

Aztec
Maya
Inca
Viking
Cliff Dwellers in American SW
Anasazi
Mesopotamian

Then we listed out what she wanted to know about them. Here is the list of questions:

  1. Where did they live?
  2. What were their homes like?
  3. What did they eat?
  4. Do we know of any myths or legends surrounding this civilization?
  5. What is their lifestyle – agrarian? nomadic? village? hunter? gatherer?
  6. What type of climate did they live in? How did that affect their lives?
  7. Did they have a known family structure? Was there a patriarch? A matriarch?
  8. Find a map that includes the area(s) they lived and mark it with what you know, both from their time and present day.
  9. What did they wear? What was their clothing made of and look like?
  10. When did their civilization begin? When was its peak? When did it disappear?
  11. What are the theories of why the civilization disappeared?
  12. Are there any remaining important landmarks or ruins? What are they? Describe and/or draw them. Mark them on the map.

Lost Civilizations plan

We found some websites and bookmarked those but our greatest reliance has been on physical resources from the library. We have checked out several books for each different group, though some of them overlap. I can list these out but it is really quite dependent on what you have access to. There are none that are just fantastically detailed, extremely helpful. What we have found is that there are several good bits of information in several different books but none are a complete resources. So, find what you can around you, use the internet, and enjoy the process.

Miss L is taking notes along the way. Then she is writing a report in a notebook on each individual civilization. She likes having all her research in one place and since she enjoys writing, this is perfect for her. And it was her choice.

This process has been interesting and, I hope, fun for her. I know she has learned quite a bit about different civilizations. It has been a good process and I hope this gives you some ideas about creating a study about something that has piqued your student’s interest.

Blessings,
At Home.

 

 

Carole P. Roman books ~ a Crew review

author Carole P. Roman books

Whenever I think about reading a book on another country or culture, the first books that come to mind are by author Carole P. Roman. The Carole P. Roman books and collections are award winning books about lots of different people and places, as well as fiction stories (some with great morals), and we are blessed to review these three this past month:

If You Were Me and Lived in . . . Russia

If You Were Me and Lived in . . . Poland

If You Were Me and Lived in . . . Germany

We were asked which books we might be interested in and these were our top three choices. Why? Because each of these countries were affected by World War II and Miss J has been studying WWII. This gave us yet another literature correlation to our study and I knew for a fact that they were quality literature. In addition to have an easy-to-read text, the If You Were Me series are written from the viewpoints of children and are written in a way that children can relate to them well. As you open each book, there is a map (not drawn to scale but still helpful) of the country, followed by a page with a globe that shows where the country is located. The books are well-researched and a pronunciation guide with definitions are provided with each one to help the readers understand a bit more about the culture. The illustrations are engaging and colorful, enhancing the enchanting text, bringing it all together.

Carole P Roman Russia

If You Were Me and Lived in . . . Russia

The book about Russia covers a lot of family words, like mother and father. As you read along, words are incorporated naturally. In talking about going to the store, the book mentions the word for a fur hat and that you would use rubles to purchase it. Major landmarks are included such as St. Basil’s Cathedral, Red Square, and the Kremlin. Food is not left out and descriptions of borscht, piroshky, caviar, samovar, and more are included. Favorite pasttimes for children are mentioned and include chess, playing with kuklas (dolls), and ice hockey. The new year is a big holiday and much of the details of it are included, from the gift bringer Ded Moroz to the New Year tree, favorite foods and the fortune teller tradition.

This was a simple look at a complex society so it is definitely not comprehensive. Yet, it is a good way for children to get a look at another culture and some of the ways in which children from there are like them and different from themselves. The text itself is not difficult but because there are a number of Russian words with pronunciations included, I would not recommend a child try to read this book alone. Guidance would be greatly beneficial for children under the age of about 10.

Carole P Roman Germany

If You Were Me and Lived in . . . Germany

The book on Germany actually begins with a bit of history about the country itself, where it and its name originated from. There is also information about the city of Berlin and its importance. Boy and girl names are shared, as well as other family names including mother and father, grandmother and grandfather, and aunt and uncle. The beautiful castle Neuschwanstein is pictured (an actual picture, not a drawing – I like that it shows it accurately this way) and the history is shared. Euros and marks are talked about and why the change was made. Food, of course, is covered including hunger-inducing dishes such as sauerbraten, sauerkraut, dumplings, and apfelstrudel. (This made Miss J ask her daddy to make her some apple strudel and it was yummy!) Activities such as fussball (soccer) and going to Oktoberfest are part of their lives. It closes out with a bit more history and several interesting facts about Germany.

Carole P Roman inside Germany Book

I like that this story contains so many bits of the history of the country, as well as the information on the actual culture that we would expect. Between the history, the food, and all the words, I feel like this is a good book to help someone know a bit more about Germany. The story is engaging and easy to read, though the pronunciations of the foreign words will make it a bit more difficult for a child.

Carole P Roman Poland

If You Were Me and Lived in . . . Poland

Poland was one that I chose solely due to the involvement of the country in World War II. It is often mentioned so I felt it would be a good one for Miss J to know a bit more aobut. This book definitely did its part for that, without getting so much information that she didn’t understand any of it. One of the fun bits about this book on Poland is that backgrounds of almost all of the pages are actual photographs that have drawings on top of them. This allows the beauty of the country to be seen clearly.

The book, like the Germany book, give a lot of history about the country. From the various names for Poland itself to a legend about how the city of Warsaw got its name, the text is engaging. Because much of Poland’s interest includes famous people, the book includes people such as the composer Chopin and the astronomer Copernicus. Sports are important to these people and so football (pilka nozna), skiing, and sledding are featured, as well as ice hockey. Food is shared through a trip to the grocery store and dinner at the grandparents. From mleko and hleb (milk and bread) to rosol broth, makaron, sledz and pierogi, hunger creeps up reading about the food. Bird watching and a game called “spot the gnome” are fun activities for all ages in Poland.

Carole P Roman books

Overall Thoughts

While each book contains many of the same types of information, each one seems so very different. That is partly because of the different culture of each book but I also feel that Carole P. Roman does a great job of writing the differently, with a slightly different focus that helps you get a feel for things that are important to that culture. For example, Germany seems to have a big focus on history while Poland’s focus in on activity and outdoor sports. This keeps each book in the series fresh and new and exciting, even when you are reading several of them back-to-back.

This is a wonderful series for children to learn more about other cultures around the world and is a great supplement to any country or continent study that you may be doing. As I mentioned, we pulled a bunch that we already had on the shelf for our WWII study and then added these when they arrived at th house. A couple of years ago when we were doing a continent study, I put the various If You Were Me books that went with the continent in the basket along with the other items to help us get a feel for what the continent was like. These are so very flexible and packed with such good information that I highly recommend them.

And one of the best parts – they get read and enjoyed! When these three books arrived at the house, they disappeared into one bedroom and the another and were read by two of the three girls within two hours of receiving them. The other young lady had read them in a couple of days. The appeal of these books is strong and since the content is quality, I don’t mind giving them free rein to read them.

Blessings,
At Home.

Be sure to read more about the Carole P. Roman books and collections that Homeschool Review Crew families were reading. We have read and reviewed books by this author before, both 2017 and 2016, and always enjoy them. Some of our past reviews include

 

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Carole P. Roman books and collections {Carole P. Roman Reviews}

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