WASP WWII Museum – Middle School Monday

WASP field trip

Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASPs) were a group of women who did great service for the United States and its Allies during WWII. After the men had left for war, there was a great hole left and these women trained to fill that hole. Over the course of the years, over 1800 were accepted into the training program and about 1100 graduated, going on to serve on various bases around the US.

The WASPs ferried aircraft around the country, served a tow-target gunnery pilots, some as test pilots, and in various other capacities. They flew military planes though they were only recognized as civilian pilots. Over all, they flew over 60 million miles in 78 types of aircraft. These aircraft went from the smallest trainers to the fastest fighters and the heaviest bombers of the time. 38 WASPs gave their lives during this time.

In 1977, the women pilots were finally recognizes as WWII veterans. In 2010, their contribution to the war was recognized with a Congressional God Medal.

Sweetwater, TX, and Avenger Field is home to the WASP WWII Museum. In a 1929 hanger set on a hill, there is a small collection of interesting displays highlighting and honoring these women and all that they did for the war. The museum admission is free but they won’t say no to your donation. We also purchased a book titled “We Were WASPS” by Winifred Wood with drawings by Dorothy Swain, both WASPs.

We found the example of the barracks very interesting – one of the girls kept commenting on the cots they slept on. We saw examples of the types of transmitters and other communication boxes. We viewed a memorial to the women who lost their lives during the WASP program. We read about Jacqueline Cochran, who began the WASP program (interesting story and background!). We were able to view a film about the program with footage from Avenger Field. The girls sat in one of the trainers, or simulators, that were used and there were handprints from some of the WASPS along with their biographies. We were able to see pictures of many, if not all, of the graduating classes and textbooks that they used.

It did not take more than an hour to dawdle our way through the museum but we did enjoy it quite a bit. I had been wanting to stop since we pass it every time we make a trek to New Mexico. I am glad we were able to make the stop this time and enjoy this bit of history.

At Home.

More Holiness Give Me – hymn

Known to be called “My Prayer” by its composer, this hymn caught me by surprise this morning. Not because I don’t know it and not because I have never sung it. Quite the contrary – we have sung it often and I generally think about a phrase or two in it. Today, each word seemed to stand out a bit more strongly, grabbing my attention.

Each line is so packed full of meaning, of intensity, of where I need to be. I encourage you to read through this hymn slowly, steadily thinking on each line and how to apply it. There are so many scripture that jump to mind that go with each line of the hymn.

But my prayer, while reflected in each line, is definitely the final on:
More, Savior, like Thee.

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More Holiness Give More Holiness Give MeMe

lyrics and music: Philip P. Bliss (1873)

1 More holiness give me,
More striving within;
More patience in suff’ring,
More sorrow for sin;
More faith in my Savior,
More sense of His care.
More joy in His service,
More purpose in prayer.

2 More gratitude give me,
More trust in the Lord;
More pride in His glory,
More hope in His word.
More tears for His sorrows,
More pain at His grief;
More meekness in trial,
More praise for relief.

3. More purity give me,
More strength to o’ercome;
More freedome from earth-stains,
More longings for home;
More fit for the kingdom,
More used would I be;
More blessed and holy,
More, Savior, like Thee.

 

How to let go? (Abandon) ~ FMF & Blogging Through The Alphabet

I am combining two tasks this week. The word for Five Minute Friday is ABANDON and the letter for Blogging Through The Alphabet is H.

H How to let go

GO –

We were on Spring Break this week and took some time. We abandoned all that we had been doing because we were physical, mentally, and emotionally worn out. We had abandon things. We went to a different place, relaxed, visited with loved ones, did some fun things, and recovered.

But in order to do that, we had to let go – abandon – what we were already doing. That is hard sometimes. I often tell myself that we have to keep on schedule; we have to keep going. We cannot stop. We cannot abandon the job. I have been given the job of guiding my children as they grow. I cannot abandon that!!!

But I often take that – I cannot abandon my job of guiding my children – to mean that I cannot stop doing the things that we are already doing. And that? That is wrong.

I can abandon, and should, many things. When something is causing daily grief? Abandon it and replace it with something that is better. When something is causing ache? Abandon it and replace it with something that brings joy. When something is causing a rift between family or friends or, worse, God’s people? Abandon it! Quickly.

We often think of abandoning things as bad. But how do we view letting go? Not as big a deal but just as permanent. So retrain your brain here – abandon/let go of the things that prevent you from doing whatever it is you need to be doing, whether it be guiding your children, helping others, or just carrying on daily with a cheerful heart and mind.

How do we let go? With joy, knowing that we are going to be refilling that space with better things.

At Home.

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In The Land of Fadeless Day (No Night There) ~ hymn

This week our hymn has been In The Land of Fadeless Day, also known as No Night There. It is a very beautiful, almost haunting melody that has a much sadder sound to me than the joyful words that are set to this melody.

What beautiful thought of the heaven, the city, prepared for us where day never fades, where the beauty will not pass away. The description of the city should make anyone desire to be in this place – gates of pearl, streets laid with gold, no night, a crystal river, but beat of all? No need for sunshine because the Lamb, Jesus, is there and He is the light. He is the only light we need.

God cares so much for us. He wipes away our tears, as the chorus states. He has created a place for us that is so beautiful, so pure, so full of hope that none of the worries, fears, and pains we have on this earth exist. What a lovely place. There is no night there.

Want to hear this song? Visit the Great Songs Chapel to hear this song sung by those who love the Lord.

God has give us such a clear set of expectations to be able to go to this amazing place. He states things clearly in His word. If you are in Him, you will be with Him. Search His word. Find those things that He says are required to spend eternity with Him. I hope you are in Him, in His kingdom, so that we can walk those streets paved with gold, view those pearly gates, and get to spend eternity singing His praises together. I hope to see you there.

At Home.

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In The Land of Fadeless Day (No Night There)

words: John R. Clements, 1899
music: Hart P. Danks, 1899

1 In the land of fadeless day
lies the city four-square;
it shall never pass away
and there is no night there.

Refrain:
God shall wipe away all tears;
there’s no death, no pain, nor fears;
and thy count not time by years
for there is no night there.

2 All the gates of pearl are made
in the city four-square;
all the streets with gold are laid,
and there is no night there. [Refrain]

3 And the gates shall never close
in the city four-square,
there life’s crystal river flows,
and there is no night there. [Refrain]

4 There thy need no sunshine bright,
in that city four-square;
for the Lamb is all the light,
and there is no night there. [Refrain]

When It Doesn’t Come Together

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Today, I am a featured guest over on the Homeschool Review Crew blog.

There are days when we struggle with educating our children, just as every teacher has rough spots, rough days, days when things just don’t work like you expect them to. That is what I want to chat with you a bit about. So, if you would, please head over to the Homeschool Review Crew blog and see what I have to say about When It Doesn’t Come Together.

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GIANTS : The Dwarfs of Auschwitz – Book Club

Book club:Ladybug Daydrams and At Home where life happens

This month, Wendy and I decided to read separate books to share about. We have very different tastes, which is really good. However, she had one she really wanted to read and I did, as well. So, we each read our own and are sharing about them today. Wendy wrote about The Girl On The Train.giants-the-dwarfs-of-auschwitz

GIANTS: The Dwarfs of Auschwitz – The Extraordinary Story of the Lilliput Troupe
by Yehuda Koren & Eilat Negev

In most books, I don’t read the Foreword or the Introduction. This one, however, was filled with fantastic information. Telling the background of how this story came about was fascinating. So, I start out by saying, “Don’t skip this.”

Meet the Ovitz family. Meet each of the interesting people, these unique souls. It begins in 1866, long before the horrors of the story come about. We meet the ancestors who formed the character of the Ovitz family and the fortitude with which they faced life.

The Ovitz family was made up of seven dwarfs and their tall family members. They are an all-dwarf performance group during the 1930s and 1940s in Eastern Europe (Transylvania, specifically the town of Rozavlea). They traveled all over and we very well known.

However, one major problem arose for this well-known and loved group – they were Jewish and they didn’t fit the Nazi German idea for a normal person. This family was rounded up with so many millions of others and sent to a concentration camp – Auschwitz to be specific. They stayed together, as their mother so often had reminded them to do before passing on from this life. And that probably saved their lives. Seven dwarfs in a single family arrived together and caught the attention of those who were told to watch for twins for Dr. Mengele.

Dr. Mengele was very happy to have a group of so many dwarfs, along with their tall siblings, to add to his medical experiments. While the dwarfs lives were spared for these experiments rather than being sent to the gas chambers or the incenerators like 9 out of every 10 who arrived at  Auschwitz, their lives were made absolutely miserable (not a good word but no other word comes to mind) by this doctor. They were poked, proded, injected, had specimens taken from them, and a million other variations of private invasion to see if the doctor could determine just what he wanted to know.

This family survived and were able to leave the concentration camps but they still had a long road ahead of them. These who were so well-off before the Nazi invasions were now destitute. And in a world where everything they needed had to be specially made, this was a great hard-ship, even with their able bodied siblings alongside. Moving to Israel, the family begins the slow process of rebuilding their lives.

My thoughts:
This story was absolutely fascinating, though incredibly difficult to read at points. I still struggle to understand how the world had something like the Nazi regime occur and how the atrocities that went on were approved of by men who thought themselves right. The awful, disgusting experiments that were done on the Ovitz family and so many, many others are unbelievable. But this story is one that will touch you deeply.

The love of the family for each other and for their heritage and religion is beautiful to read. I enjoyed reading about the Ovitz family because it brought another layer of understanding to my knowledge of WWII. To read about the world this family came from and the one they died in and all that was between is to read and feel the human story of life in some of the brightest days and some of the darkest of humanity.

I highly recommend this book to adults. There is certainly too much in it for most teenagers to be reading when it comes to the detail of the experiments that were performed. But it is a good book to read and see the resilience of humanity and the neighborliness that can exist, even when things are dark.the-whistler

Next Month:
In April, we will posting about the book The Whistler by John Grisham. This will be interesting. I used to love to read John Grisham so we’ll see if I still enjoy it. 🙂

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book club button 200

 

Giraffe Party – Blogging Through the Alphabet

g-giraffe-partyg-giraffe-costume

Miss J just turned 8! I can hardly believe how fast the years are going, but I know every parent must feel that way. She invited her friends over for an animal party, though her focus was on giraffes. This is her favorite animal and has been for several years now.

She asked her friends to dress as their favorite animal, so, of course, she dressed as a giraffe. This was the easiest costume. Ever! I got a brown shirt that she had and turned it inside out. Using making tape, I just stuck pieces of different lengths on at different angles until the whole shirt was covered. I did the same with a pair of brown leggings that she had. We added to this a headband that I taped ears and horns (not what they are really called) onto. After putting her hair in a bun, she was the cutest giraffe I have ever seen.

We played pin the tail on the giraffe. For this, I gave each child a small piece of paper and had them draw their own giraffe tail. We had printed off a coloring page of a giraffe that I found through a search engine. We printed it on multiple pages and taped them together. Easy – peasy. Bonus? It is now a poster in Miss J’s room!

g-cake

We ordered pizza because salad, the food of giraffes, is just not the favorite thing for this 8 year old. We put her newest addition to her toys, Squinkie animals, onto the cake for decorations. We had blue kool-aid since giraffes drink water. Truly, easy party, y’all!

We had lots of fun and enjoyed our time with friends a lot. And now, I have an 8 year old.

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