Ancient Greece ~ a Crew review

ancient-greece-review

History is a favorite topic around the three giggly girls and the opportunity to review HISTORY Through the Ages Project Passport World History Study: Ancient Greece from Home School in the Woods was one we were more than happy to ask for.

Home School in the Woods is a company we have reviewed for in the past so we are well acquainted with the high quality of their products and the information they include. When you choose a product from Home School in the Woods, you are getting something that has been thoroughly researched and well written, with illustrations that are classic and realistic as well as accurate. Home School in the Woods is the family business of the Pak family. Headed by Amy Pak, the history products are packed full of learning through timelines, maps, reading, listening, and creating. A true hands-on product, Home School in the Woods brings history to life. HISTORY Through the Ages Project Passport World History Study

HISTORY Through the Ages Project Passport World History Study: Ancient Greece is a combination of a timeline project, learning through hands-on projects, and reading historically accurate information about a time period. Throw in some crafts and a lapbook and you have the gist of Project Passport studies. We were sent the link to download the study and it downloaded a zip file. We then unzipped that and following the instructions, it opened the study in a web browser. From there, it is easy to open each time and to navigate through the study.ancient-greece-opening-page

Once I had the study opened in the browser, I spent a little bit of time getting familiar with the project and reading the Introduction, Travel Tips, and Travel Planner. I then printed the binder information for Miss E, the student who was going to be traveling to Ancient Greece through Home School in the Woods. I also printed off all that was needed for the first two stops.

Each lesson in Ancient Greece is labeled a stop. Each stop has several parts to it. There are 25 stops in the entire study. Most stops include timeline work, writing something for the newspaper, a postcard from a famous person related to the theme of that stop, and some minibooks or activities associated with the theme. A few of the stops include an audio tour, as well. Some of the stops have taken a couple of hours but most stops are less than an hour. It all depends on how artistic and crative your student desires to be with each part of the stop.scrapbook-of-sights

So far in the stops, Miss E has visited Athens, Sparta, learned a bit about the Archaic Period, Greek Government, and everyday life in Ancient Greece. These are the first 7 stops. Miss E is working on stop 7 at this time. We are averaging just over one stop a week, with each stop broken up over a couple of days. Other topics still to come include: farming, business, and transportation; education, oration and literature; science; medicine and disease; the arts; philosophy; religion; and warfare. Each topic has readings and activities to really help you get into and learn about history and the people.map-work

There are some things that we really, really like about the HISTORY Through the Ages programs.

  • They are rich with well-researched history and cultural information.
  • The activities are so widely varied that the interest in continually renewed.
  • The program is so well laid out that it is easy for me as the teacher to get what the student needs without having to spend a lot of time fumbling through files. However, if the program didn’t open right or something goes wrong with it, I can still access each of the printable files from the zip folder.
  •  It is easily adaptable for the student. If they don’t do well with writing, you can leave out the newspaper or assign it in a different way. If they don’t like to draw, you can just have the student read the postcard; they don’t have to illustrate it. If a mini-project is too difficult or really not interesting, you can skip it because there is so much more in each stop. Adapt and change to meet the needs and interests of the students – key quality!
  • The timeline is thorough and full of information. This alone makes the program a very good investment. If all the student did was read the guide book and do the timeline, a very good knowledge of Ancient Greece would be gained.
  • The activities are fun.
  • The audio “tours” are lively and interesting.
  • It is easy for the student to self-pace the program so I don’t have to be hyper-focused on which piece she is working on each day.
  • While it takes quite a bit of printing and paper, it is used to create a final product that the student will be proud of having created.

timeline-and-more

As far as dislikes, there just aren’t many. I do wish there were an easier way to get started. The first two stops are labor intensive because you are setting up so many of the projects that will be added to or worked on throughout the entire project. From the timeline to the maps, these things take a bit to set up. But, they are very worth it as you add to it and work with it throughout each stop. We do have a wish to see the Postcard Rack redone. It just doesn’t hold the postcards. Miss E created a page with a little envelope on it where she places the postcards after she has designed them. That works much better for her and she doesn’t lose the postcards this way. But that is it!

Miss E says, “It is a fun way to learn about history.” When asked about her favorite parts, she said that the Snapshot Moments (timeline) and postcards are her absolute favorites but that she really likes all of it. Some of the newspaper articles are hard to write but others are easy and fun and she really enjoys doing the illustrations. All in all, she gives this two thumbs up and thinks that lots of other students would enjoy it as well.

Home School in the Woods has a wonderful set of learning programs with their HISTORY Through the Ages Project Passport World History Study. Whether you choose Ancient Greece, Ancient Egypt, The Middle Ages, or Renaissance & Reformation, there is much to learn and enjoy.

And as a note of interest – Home School in the Woods is working on Ancient Rome, which is scheduled for release in 2018!

At Home.

You can also read our review of Ancient Egypt.

Please visit the Homeschool Review Crew to read about the other places you and your students can visit with the HISTORY Through The Ages programs. Just click on the image below.

HISTORY Through the Ages Project Passport World History Study Reviews

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Language Exploration – Middle School Monday

language-exploration

Have you ever had opportunity for your students to explore different languages or different ways of writing languages? Our local museum has a room that focuses on languages. Well, a few very select, very different languages. And Miss E loves exploring that room every time we go to the museum.

hieroglyphics-table

Heraldry, hieroglyphics, and pictography are the main three languages to explore here. These are not your typical “languages” but that is part of what makes these explorations so interesting. With information on their uses and templates to help you write, these languages are fun and different.

heraldry

Each time we go, Miss E sits down and writes something using each of the languages. Whether it be her name or designing a shield with heraldry symbols to describe who she is, Miss E spends a lot of time absorbing and using these languages.

 

On the wall, we see this:

letters-chart

Last time we were in the museum, Miss E spent a very long time copying down much of this chart. She found it interesting to look at the changes of the letters. She also really enjoyed seeing the letters for the Greek alphabet since she is studying Ancient Greece. She found it so interesting that she copied it carefully and added it to her Ancient Greece notebook. (The review for this study from Home School in the Woods will post today, as well.)
pictography-chart

From the many typewriters to an old-fashioned printing press to a telephone operator’s booth, there are lots of ways to explore languages that are not just studying Spanish or German or even sign language. Language is using words and symbols to communicate. And this room broadens our understanding of that.

At Home.

In Loving-Kindness Jesus Came

with-loving-kindness-jesus-cameOur hymn this week is a good reminder that God takes care of us through it all. We have chatted with the girls this week a bit more seriously than perhaps is normal since we have begun reading a couple of books with them during our devotional time. It has brought to us a bit more clearly just how much Jesus loves us.

He came to this earth. He lived a sinless life. Since the Bible tells us that Jesus experienced all the emotion and temptation that man does, I can only imagine just how difficult and weighty life must have been for Jesus. I don’t have the same temptations you do. But Jesus did. He had both yours AND mind AND everyone around us. Wow does Jesus love us!

He claimed me. And you. And anyone who will obey the will of the Father. (Matthew 7:21) In mercy, Jesus brought us out of our sin and shame. He lifted me out of the depths of despair, sin, and keeps me lifted. Even when I feel low, Jesus is holding me up.

I really was touched each time we sang the lines this week “He called me long before I heard, Before my sin-ful heart was stirred.” He didn’t wait to call me until I was ready. He called me and then wait on me to hear and respond. His grace is sufficient to lift me, to strengthen me, to be my strength.

Oh, praise His name, He lifted me!

At Home.

 

In Loving-Kindness Jesus Came

words & music: Charles H. Gabriel (1905)

 

1 In loving-kindness Jesus came
my soul in mercy to reclaim,
and from the depths of sin and shame
through grace He lifted me.

Refrain:
From sinking sand He lifted me,
with tender hand He lifted me,
from shades of night to plains of light,
O praise His name, He lifted me!

2 He called me long before I heard,
before my sinful heart was stirred,
but when I took Him at His word,
forgiven, He lifted me. [Refrain]

3 His brow was pierced with many a thorn,
His hands by cruel nails were torn,
when from my guilt and grief, forlorn,
in love He lifted me. [Refrain]

4 Now on a higher plane I dwell,
and with my soul I know ’tis well;
yet how or why, I cannot tell,
He should have lifted me. [Refrain]

Weak – Five Minute Friday

weak

Today’s prompt (actually yesterday’s but since I am writing on Saturday . . . ) is WEAK. Visit Heading Home for the link up of Five Minute Friday posts.

START –

2 Corinthians 12:9

And He said to me, “My grace is sufficient for you, My strength is made perfect in weakness.”weak-2-cor-12_9

Are you weak? I am. Often. No one likes to admit their weakness but that is something that I have always admired about Paul. He was able to admit his weaknesses and make them something overwhelmingly positive. Actually, He didn’t do that – God did.

God’s grace is sufficient for ME. And for you. And in my weakness, God’s strength is found and made perfect.

God.

God’s grace.

God’s strength.

God’s perfection.

I am certain that I will never be perfect but God’s grace allows me to be wash anew from those imperfections. I am so thankful that God’s strength is made perfect in my weakness.

END.

 

At Home.

Electrical Circuits – Blogging Through the Alphabet

e-electrical-circuits-reed-switch

A while back, my dad pulled out a couple of electrical circuitry boards that he had used to teach my brothers some things about electricity when we were all younger. He gave them to us and I set them aside for another time. Well, that time came last week when we were all feeling a bit under the weather but we still wanted to accomplish something. You know that place, right?

e-electrical-circuits-title

Well, electrical circuits to the rescue. The day was saved. At least for Miss J. She was terribly excited to see these and to try them out, now that we had bought the right batteries to run them. We have to boards. Both of them are by Science Fair. One is 60 In One Electronic Project Kit. The other is 160 In One Electronic Project Kit. We started with the smaller one.

Turns out, these were WAYYYY easier to use than I had expected. The booklets that come with them explain how to hook them up, the order in which to hook the wires up, and what each setup is supposed to do. Then, it explains why it works (or it should – we did have a couple not work correctly).

e-electrical-circuit-hook-up

We worked on a basic on/off switch. We tried out hand at traffic lights (something didn’t work there). We used a reed switch to turn on and off a light. We did two or three other small projects and then we put it away for the time being. It won’t be put away for long and it is much closer at hand now than it was before.

e-electrical-circuit-book

There is probably a good reason to work through the projects from the start of the book but we just picked a chose. It was an exploration project at the time. I imagine we will take this up a bit more regimented at some point in the not too distant future because Miss J was so interested in it.

e-electrical-circuit-board

At Home.

Join the ABC blogging group hosted by A Net In Time and Hopkins Homeschool and link up your ABC posts.

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My ABC Posts:
E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Origami Paper Dolls

origami-paper-dolls-two

As Miss L continues in her exploration of all things Asian, especially with an origin in China, she has experienced some new and different things. Recently, she was given this origami kit and she LOVES it.

origami-paper-doll-kit

She works diligently on each paper doll until she has folded and fitted and decorated each doll just right.

origami-paper-doll

The results are stunning and absolutely beautiful.

origami-paper-dolls-set

At Home.

SAFE – FMF

safe

 

This week’s Five Minute Friday prompt is SAFE. Five minutes of free-writing, no editing, free association thought = unplanned outcomes.

GO.

Safe means there is no danger. But safe changes somewhat depending on your context.

Are you talking about being safe on an adventure? Then be prepared and take the necessary precautions.

Are you talking about being emotionally safe in a relationship? Then don’t put yourself out there, don’t take unnecessary risks. Do think about your parameters and know where your boundaries are.

Are you talking about being safe on the road? Take your driver’s education course. Pick a care that has good ratings. Don’t drive in thunderstorms, snowstorms, tornadoes – you get the picture.

Are you talking about being safe in the kitchen? Be careful with knives. Don’t toss things around. Know when the stove is hot. Use hotpads. Don’t let the kiddos do things that they are not yet old enough for, tall enough for, or trained enough for.

Safe is all in the perspective. Safe is in the context of what you are talking about.

Safe implies that you have taken the time to think through what could trip you up and know how to work around that or have prepared yourself with the necessary equipment for it.

Safe means that you don’t have to worry or be concerned.

I am so thankful that I seldom do not feel safe. Because I know there are way too many people around the world who do not have that privilege. God has blessed me. I am safe.

END.

 

At Home.

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