Tag Archives: L

Recital (violin) – Blogging Through the Alphabet

R Recital (violin)

A couple of weeks ago, Miss L had her spring recital with her strings class. She has been able to participate in a string class at Baylor. This class has benefitted not only our family (in that the cost is extremely reasonable, even cheap!) but it also benefits the students at Baylor who are learning to teach in classroom settings.

The recital was lovely. She and her class, as well as the two other classes, did a fantastic job. It was lots of fun and it is such a rewarding experience for her to get to show off all of her hard work this year. And it really was.

R Recital Miss L with violin

She started the year (last September) with a little bit of violin knowledge under her beltR Recital program for string project but not much. So, she began in the Bravo class with other beginners. At semester, they determined that she had made so much progress and was playing well enough to jump up a year and join the Encore class. Now that was huge and she had a big learning curve since they all had a year more experience than she did. But she undertook the challenge, practiced daily, and did really well.

The recital was the culmination of the year. We are hoping to return next year for their 3rd year class, though I can’t remember at this point what that class will be called. She still practices (almost) daily and really enjoys playing. We will encourage this for as long as she will pursue it with a heart.

At Home.R Recital

Please visit A Net In Time and Hopkins Homeschool and link up your ABC posts.

Origami Paper Dolls

origami-paper-dolls-two

As Miss L continues in her exploration of all things Asian, especially with an origin in China, she has experienced some new and different things. Recently, she was given this origami kit and she LOVES it.

origami-paper-doll-kit

She works diligently on each paper doll until she has folded and fitted and decorated each doll just right.

origami-paper-doll

The results are stunning and absolutely beautiful.

origami-paper-dolls-set

At Home.

My New Cereal

 

my new cereal

My name is Miss L. I am 10 years old. This morning, for my creative writing, I chose to use the writing prompt that told me to make a breakfast cereal that gave the consumer super powers. this is what I wrote on the blank below it:

It would let you talk in all different kinds of languages-Polish, Portuguese, French, Korean, Japanese, Chinese, Italian, German, Bulgarian, Swedish, African, Cambodian, Irish, Mexican, Russian, Spanish, Icelandic, Indian, Turkish, Arabian, and even Native American. Everything you can think of-and more! It would taste deliciously fruity, like, really fruity, and not just artificially flavored, with a refreshing taste of mint. I’d come with a pink bowl and spoon to eat it with. And I’d call it Fruity Babble.

 

At Home.

The Giggly Girls’ Perspective – Back to Homeschool

Giggly Girls' Perspective

I decided this year, I would give you a little bit of insight into the giggly girls’ perspectives on homeschooling.

E, age 11

E – age 11

What I like about Homeschool:

  • We don’t have an exact schedule.
  • We get breaks whenever we want.
  • We get fun field trips even when we’re older.
  • We’re on a review crew so we do most of our school on those products.
  • I only have 2 teachers! Yay!
  • I can learn things like sewing and cooking.
  • We can watch TV.

What I don’t like about Homeschool:

  • Everything is harder!
  • Reviewing math programs!

L, age 9

L – age 9

I think homeschooling is really fun. I like it a lot, and for a lot of reasons. One reason is because we, well, I, get to learn cursive. My mom says that public schools don’t teach cursive anymore, which I think is wrong. I also like it because while I do my writing, cursive, memory work, history, art, science, and math, I never feel pressured, like I sometimes did at public school. There it sometimes felt like it was about finishing your work, not learning. And, in first grade, my teacher only taught me half of telling time! I like homeschooling much better, and here, we add in God!

J, age 6

J – age 6

What I like about homeschool is the math and the writing.

Truly, these are their own words. We edited spelling and some of the grammar together. But, I did not edit their sentiments at all. Ya’ll, kids get the difference. I felt really, really happy when I read what L wrote about the pressure. She was 6 at the time. 6! And feeling the stress and pressure of completion, but not learning. It just makes my heart sing all the more that we brought them home.

When you start looking at research, there are so many reasons to bring them home. As E gets into her teen years, I see the difference that sleep makes. She is able to get the sleep she needs, which makes her attitude and ability to learn better. There is research being shared more often now that shows that the accumulation of lack of sleep is detrimental to young people. I am so glad that we can allow them the sleep they need, the learning the yearn for, and the enjoyment of subjects that “float their boat.”

I am not knocking public schools but I understand their hands are tied. My children are worth the investment of my time, effort, and money (yes, money – homeschooling is not cheap, though there are plenty of ways to cut costs – check out this post for some of my ideas). Not parenting them, of which overseeing their education is a part, has much, much too high a cost – our children.

I am so thrilled at the joy my girls are finding in education at home. Not school at home but education and learning. We are looking forward to a fun, enjoyable year filled with a variety of Review Crew products and delight led learning. Bring on the horses, sewing, cooking, writing, and math.

A list of all posts related to the Back To Homeschool Blog Hop 2015 came be found under the Back to Homeschool page.
At Home.

Back to Homeschool Blog Hop

This post is part of the Back To Homeschool Blog Hop, sponsored by School House Review Crew and Homeschool Blogging Connection. There are over 50 bloggers participating in the blog hop so you have lots of reading to do! Click on the picture to be taken to the listing of all participating bloggers and find something to encourage you today.

Summer Fresh Drink Choice

Lemonade summer

A few weeks ago, our blogging friend over at Farm Fresh Adventures asked us to share some of our favorite summer recipes on her blog. When I asked the girls about what some of their favorite recipes were, two of them said “I don’t know.” One of them jumped up and said

“Lemonade!!!! It is so yummy and fun to make!”

So, I asked if L could share her recipe for lemonade. Farm Fresh Adventures was all for it and published her recipe a couple of days ago. I’d love it if you would hope over and check out L’s recipe for this summertime favorite. Then feel free to pop back over here and tell us what you think. We’d love to know if you try her recipe.

L’s Lemonade recipe at Farm Fresh Adventures

She had lots of fun making a test batch to ensure she had the right measurements and she had lots of fun drinking it afterwards. Writing the recipe down was a good exercise in making sure her words match the action she wanted someone to take. She wrote it down and then I described what I would do based on what she said. She didn’t have to rewrite much but there were one or two things that she decided to change based on that exchange. Writing a how-to was a change to our writing activities and I think it was a good one.

At Home.

Doll Purses

purses free tutorial

Make It Work Monday is all about accessories for 18″ dolls today. L came to me wanting to make purses to go in the boutique that she is creating for one of her dolls. She knew exactly what she wanted but didn’t know how to do it herself. She wanted to sew them. So, we went to work.

Heading to the sewing area, she described what she wanted and I pulled out some scrap fabric. We used scrap and leftover or salvaged pieces for every bit of these purses. We talked about each step before sewing it so she could veto it if things didn’t look right. Moving right along, here is what she created:

Purse design 1

Now, it is tutorial time! As we went along with the second one, I took pictures so that you could make some of your own. These are simple and, had I been doing them myself would only have taken 20 minutes, max. With L, age 8, doing the sewing, these took about 45 minutes. The second one was definitely faster than the first, so I suspect that future ones will be even quicker.

Step 1: Select and cut your fabric. This is a rectangle about 6 inches wide x 7 inches long. This can be adjusted for a wide or narrower, longer or shorter bag. Just modify for what you need.

Purse pic 1

Step 2: Fold it in half from the width, right sides together. Sew down the long side and across one of the short sides. Pin it before sewing if you need to. For a child, definitely pin it before sewing. It just helps keep the fabric lined up so well.

Purses pic 2

Step 3: Turn the fabric right side out. Press with an iron.

Step 4: Tuck the raw, unfinished edges in about 1/4″ – 1/2″. If a child is doing the sewing, tuck a larger amount in so it is easier to ensure that the raw edge is caught and held. If I am sewing it, I’ll just tuck 1/4″. Pin and sew. Press.

Purses pic 4

Step 5: Fold one end up about 3 inches. You will be sewing up the edge to create the biggest part of the purse. Tuck 3/4″ of ribbon in between the front and back of the purse, along the seam line you will be sewing. This will allow you to sew up the center of the ribbon, ensuring it is caught and held. Sew both sides.

Purses pic 5Purses pic 4

Step 6: Hand sew a snap on as a closure. (If you want to do a piece of Velcro and sew it with the machine, you should probably do that before step 5.)

Purses 6Purses pic 7

Step 7: If desired, add an embellishment to the front of the purse. L’s note: You can add ribbons and little buttons and things like that to make it extra special, the way that you want it.

Purses pic 8

Isn’t this a sweet little purse she designed? I love her creativity and her ability to see something in her mind and describe it in a way that I can help her bring it to reality. That is a talent that I dearly hope she is able to hold onto as she matures. It will be invaluable. I am so proud of L! At Home.

Talking about Mammoths, part 2

mammoths part 2

We did a few things relating to the mammoths this week. (See the post on our field trip.) But, I was not in a terribly creative mood, I guess, because I had some real trouble thinking up some ideas. So, after we had used the files from the Waco Mammoth Site, I went with a bit broader category: fossils.

The Waco Mammoth Site has a lot of educational printables for various age groups. I went through and picked out a few for each of the girls that I felt would appropriately challenge or review materials. Here are the ones the girls did.

mammoth L mammoths E mammoths J

 

On E and L’s scientific name worksheet, it had them create their own animal using scientific names and draw it. After they had done that, I had them brainstorm ideas about what happened to their animal and more specific details about their animal. They had to come up with a lot of words about their animals. Once we had a white board full, each girl was asked to create a story or a poem or a written account of their animal. I don’t have copies of those finished products but the girls enjoyed that writing assignment.

On another day, we explored fossils. We got down all of the fossils that we have tucked away. E and L got down on the floor (so that dropped fossils would be less likely to break and the floor would be less likely to be damaged) and touched, examined, talked about, felt, and explored the fossils we have. We have various real fossils and then we have a few that were made by pressing a shell or other natural object into plaster of paris or air dry clay. The girls spent probably 45 minutes discussing and talking about all of the fossils.

mammoths shark teeth mammoths fossils

After their chatter began dying down, I handed them a worksheet I had created and asked them to each choose one fossil to complete the worksheet on. This included a measuring activity in both inches and centimeters. There was a box to describe, factually, what the fossil was like. They were encouraged to describe it with as many of their senses as they could, as well as anything specific they could observe about it. There was place for them to draw their fossil. One box had them describing where their fossil might have been found. And a final box had them describing what the fossil might be from and why. They were also asked to color-code their page: blue for facts and yellow for opinion/theory/hypothesis.

mammoths fossil sheet

It surprised me that the girls were excited to complete these. E actually asked to complete two of these, so I let her. They also choose to sit down together and share their findings.

mammoths sharing

After these were completed, we got out our posters on poetry styles. We reviewed poetry styles, including limericks, lyrical poems, cinquain, and more. They each chose one style of poetry to use and wrote a poem about their fossil. L’s favorite style is always lyrical; she loves rhymes and descriptive phrases and long, flowy sentences. E’s favorite style is almost always cinquain. Here is their poetry.

mammoths E poems mammoths L poem
I am linking below to the information page the girls filled out. You are welcome to use this and share it but please link back to this post when you are sharing it.

Fossil worksheet

Our mammoth and fossil study has been fun. I have a couple of other ideas that I would like to do but we’ll see if they happen or not! Please share with me if you study mammoths or fossils or something related. I’d love to know what you do. At Home.

 

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